Controversial Florida prosecutors receives noose in the mail

A racist letter arrived for Orange Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala arrived at her office on March 20 before she received a noose the following week

Noose Sent to Fla. State Attorney Aramis Ayala's Office

Aside from debating life and death, the conversation around Florida's death penalty has some racist undertones, as evidenced this week after Orange-Osceola State Attorney Aramis Ayala said a noose was mailed to her office.

The Orange County Sheriff's office is now investigating a racially motivated hate crime after a noose and multiple threatening letters were sent to the office of State Attorney, Aramis Ayala.

Ayala is Florida's first black State Attorney and admits to receiving a lot of flack after her decision. It had a postcard "with a hangman's noose in green twine taped to the card", according to the report.

The content of both letters was redacted by the Sheriff's Office. A clerk saw a racist message scrawled on an envelope addressed to Ayala, who is Florida's first African-America state attorney.

Earlier this month, Florida Gov. Rick Scott removed Ayala from almost two dozen first-degree murder cases after she announced that her office would not pursue the death penalty against Markeith Loyd.

Ayala has said publicly she is not backing down from her position.

Governor Rick Scott reassigned 23 of Ayala's capital murder cases after she announced her refusal to seek the death penalty
Governor Rick Scott reassigned 23 of Ayala's capital murder cases after she announced her refusal to seek the death penalty

Authorities say they are now investigating.

After her announcement, Gov.

Officials say the letter came after Ayala announced she would not pursue the death penalty under her administration.

Earlier this month, Scott signed 21 additional executive orders putting King in charge of other capital cases, many of which were already in progress or had defendants that had long ago been sentenced to death - but who needed to be re-sentenced because the Florida death penalty statute had been found unconstitutional.

Ayala is now suing Scott, claiming he can't remove her from the cases.

She also never disclosed her stance on capital punishment while campaigning against former State Attorney Jeff Ashton.

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