Congress budget deal cuts Trump's border wall short

US needs 'good shutdown' in September to fix ‘mess’- India Tv

US needs 'good shutdown' in September to fix 'mess': Donald Trump

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and White House economic adviser Gary Cohn on Monday said in separate interviews with CBS' "This Morning" that they thought there were enough votes to pass the bill this week.

"This week, our Republican team had its own victory under the radar", Trump told the gathering.

It also came at the start of a week in which the House is considering a possible vote on a health care overhaul that would repeal and replace Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act.

The House is scheduled to vote on the bipartisan $1.1 trillion measure Wednesday afternoon. Trump tweeted in apparent defense of the budget deal, which would fund the government until October 1.

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin defended the package, calling it an "important first step in the right direction" that included a "big down payment" on border security and the military.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said Sunday: "The bill ensures taxpayer dollars aren't used to fund an ineffective border wall".

In fact, the White House on Monday had praised the deal as a win for the nation's military, health benefits for coal miners and other Trump priorities.

But the president appeared to indicate unhappiness with the budget plan when he kicked off the day by taking to Twitter.

Senate Republicans recently triggered the "nuclear option" to eliminate the 60-vote filibuster threshold for Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch.

- Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 2, 2017either elect more Republican Senators in 2018 or change the rules now to 51%.

Trump had complained earlier Tuesday about having to work with Democrats, tweeting that, "Our country needs a good "shutdown" in September to fix mess!"

That contradicted Trump's message less than a week ago.

One senior administration official said Trump was "not happy" as he watched Democrats claim victory in the budget negotiations, and a second senior administration official said Trump was baffled that Democrats felt they could claim victory.

But while Mulvaney acknowledged that the border work funded by the new budget deal would not allow for construction of the full border wall the White House insists it will secure funding for in the next round of budget talks, he also torqued up the spin to tout a win for Trump. "We're getting there", said Representative Tom MacArthur of New Jersey, a moderate Republican who brokered the deal that revived the healthcare legislation. "Not one", he said in April. Budget Director Mick Mulvaney briefed reporters twice within a few hours to adamantly declare the administration's success.

"The President added that that "we actually have a clause that guarantees" coverage for those with pre-existing conditions". "I feel good about the wins we got with the administration in this bill".

Previous shutdowns have cost the United States economy tens of billions of dollars and seen federal services grind to a halt, as thousands of non-essential personnel are temporarily laid off. The 16-day partial government shutdown in 2013 cost $24 billion, according to Moody's and Standard and Poor's. That included lost revenue for the national parks.

Mulvaney said the president wants to "fix" Washington. Patty Murray, D-Wash.

"What you heard the president express this morning was frustration over how he was treated as part of the negotiations", Mulvaney said during a press briefing at the White House on Tuesday.

Mulvaney cited a $15 billion infusion of defense spending - about half of what Trump asked for in March - as a huge win. There are also no cuts to funding for Planned Parenthood or the $18 billion in cuts to nondefense spending that Trump had requested in his budget proposal.

Trump, however, obtained $1.5 billion for border security measures such as 5,000 additional detention beds, an upgrade in border infrastructure and technologies such as surveillance.

Republicans, however, remain divided over key aspects of the bill, with some lawmakers worrying about a potential spike in the number of people without coverage, or sharp increases in insurance premiums. Upton described the plan to The Associated Press.

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