UAE denies Washington Post report it orchestrated Qatar hack

Qatar said in late May that hackers had posted fake remarks by the emir

Qatar said in late May that hackers had posted fake remarks by the emir

On June 5, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Egypt severed diplomatic ties with Doha in retaliation for what they described as Qatar's support for terrorism and extremism, its hostile policy and intervention in the affairs of Arab states.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt imposed sanctions on Qatar on 5 June.

The United Arab Emirates arranged for Qatari government social media and news sites to be hacked in late May in order to post fiery but false quotes linked to Qatar's emir, prompting a diplomatic crisis, the Washington Post reported on Sunday, citing USA intelligence officials.

Speaking at the Chatham House global affairs think tank in London, Gargash repeated claims - denied by Qatar - that the country funds extremists.

"This is our message: You can not be part of a regional organization dedicated to strengthening mutual security and furthering mutual interests, and at the same time undermine that security and harm those interests". Qatar has denied the accusations.

"We´ve sent a message to Qatar". We are not after regime change.

"We do see signs now, however, that our pressure is working", Gargash said.

Regarding the possibility of Qatar being excluded from the GCC, Gargash said: "The GCC is in crisis and I don´t think it serves our purposes to say let´s take Qatar out".

Qatar has accused its neighbours of being behind an alleged cyber attack on Doha´s state media which set into motion the current diplomatic crisis. On the following day, a story appeared on the Qatari News Agency's website quoting a speech by Qatar's emir, Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad al-Thani, in which he allegedly praised Iran and said Qatar has a good relationship with Israel.

Still, the four Arab powers have said the memorandum fell short of allaying their concerns, that their sanctions would remain in place until Doha meets their demands and that they would keep a close eye on Qatar's efforts to fight terrorism funding.

The UAE hacked the websites or paid for getting them hacked (which is still unclear) in order to post false quotes linked to Qatar's emir, prompting the Qatar-Gulf diplomatic crisis, the Washington Post reported on Sunday, citing USA intelligence officials.

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