Biggest Threat to Trump's Agenda Comes from Fellow Republicans

CBS News Poll

CBS News Poll

"Republican senators who have been a thorn in President Trump's side are beginning to see the political consequences of opposing the White House as pro-Trump activists start to mobilize", says the story retweeted by the president.

The president has been smarting from the Senate's failure to pass an overhaul of the Affordable Care Act, a long-standing priority for the GOP and a marquee campaign promise from Trump past year.

Moving forward, a majority of the public (60 percent) says President Trump and Republicans in Congress are responsible for any problems with the ACA.

Paul said Friday that he doesn't think efforts to repeal Obamacare are over.

On Thursday, Trump's main mainstream media ally Fox News joined the president in lashing out at McConnell and congressional Republicans.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blamed President Trump's early timelines, saying, "Our new president has of course not been in this line of work before and I think had excessive expectations about how quickly things happen in the democratic process". All of the measures failed to win the 50 votes needed in July. After using Twitter to blame McConnell for last month's Senate failure despite years of GOP vows to repeal it, Trump suggested Thursday that McConnell should perhaps step aside if he can't push that and other legislation through his chamber. The show of support came from moderates and conservatives. And not only do 78 percent of Americans want the Trump administration to do what it can to make ObamaCare work, but that includes 52 percent of Republicans and 51 percent of Trump supporters. For a White House that often seems more concerned with cementing support from Trump's loyalists than embracing the political center, that might help explain the president's persistence on the issue. Far fewer want Republicans to continue working on their own plan to repeal and replace the law (21%) or move on to other priorities (21%). Most of those who say it is a good thing say they do not want the law repealed at all (34% of the public overall), while fewer (23% of the public overall) say it is because they had concerns with the specific bill being debated. There has been a 9-percentage-point increase in people who hold a favorable view since November.

Designed and analyzed by public opinion researchers at the Kaiser Family Foundation, the poll was conducted from August 1 - 6 among a nationally representative random digit dial telephone sample of 1,211 adults.

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