Dead After Car Plows into Protesters in Va.

The kids are alt-right: Your guide to the new crop of white nationalists

More people, groups speak out against Unite the Right rally

One person died after a vehicle plowed into a group of people peacefully protesting at the rally yesterday while two others died following a helicopter crash that took place near the protest site in Charlottesville, Virginia. Virginia Police said two more people died when a helicopter crashed near protest site. He said the city of Charlottesville and McAuliffe violated the court ruling because they "didn't like the outcome".

The fighting broke out in the city's downtown when hundreds of people, some wearing white nationalist symbols and carrying Confederate battle flags, were confronted by a almost equal number of counter-protesters.

The driver was later arrested, authorities said. A video showed some people encouraging fights and others using pepper spray against each other. "We love our country, we love our God, we love our flag, we're proud of our country, we're proud of who we are", Trump said.

Some folks from the East Bay city hope extremists on both sides of the political spectrum end the rhetoric that has ignited recent violence.

On Saturday morning, fighting broke out in the city's downtown when hundreds of people, some wearing white nationalist symbols and carrying Confederate battle flags, were confronted by a almost equal number of counter-protesters. Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency. "We agreed that the hate and the division must stop, and must stop right now".

"We are all Americans first", he said.

This time, the extreme right brought in big names of the "alt-right" movement - which has been emboldened, critics say, by Trump's ascent to the White House - in a bid to attract more supporters.

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides, on many sides", Trump said Saturday at his country club in Bedminster, N.J.

The president's silence had been noticeable Friday night, as a few hundred tiki torch-bearing white supremacists - mostly young men - paraded through the University of Virginia campus while chanting racist taunts and flaunting Nazi paraphernalia.

Vice President Mike Pence had also remained quiet until Trump tweeted his message Saturday, at which pointed the vice president appended it with a note urging people to "join together & oppose those seeking to divide us".

Charlottesville Mayor Michael Signer said he was disgusted that the white nationalists had come to his town and blamed Trump for inflaming racial prejudices.

Alt-right leader Richard Spencer and former Ku Klux Klan member David Duke attended the demonstrations.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors extremist groups, said Saturday's "Unite the Right Rally" could mark one of the most significant demonstrations of its kind in decades.

But some of the white nationalists cited Trump's victory as validation for their beliefs, and Trump's critics pointed to the president's racially tinged rhetoric as exploiting the nation's festering racial tension.

For many Americans, they are outdated symbols of racism and slavery, and have been mobilizing to have them taken down from public places.

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