Kenya court blames polls commission for botched vote

Odinga accused of fearing new presidential elections

We're ready to pay 'ultimate price' - Defiant Kenyan Chief Justice

But in a statement, OT-Morpho cautioned that it was unable to deploy the same equipment that was used on August 8. The petitions claim misconduct and bias.

He has declared that Kenya has "a problem" with the Supreme Court, calling the judges crooks who stole the election from him and threatening to "fix" the judiciary if he wins the redo election on October 17.

The Supreme Court said the IEBC had announced Kenyatta's victory over opposition leader Raila Odinga without properly verifying the result, outlining a tallying process that had gone "opaquely awry". But the court overturned the election because of irregularities and ordered a new vote next month.

He said the Cabinet had approved the budget for fresh elections, expected to cost some 10 billion shillings ($96 million).

Four judges and two dissenting judges gave a detailed case for voiding the election - or upholding it - in a marathon 12-hour court session on Wednesday.

The Al Ghurair printing firm should also be blacklisted in Odinga's opinion because the ballot papers it supplied lacked security features.

On concerns that there would be increased violence and protests if he lost the fresh elections, Odinga stated, "If I lose elections fairly, I will accept and tell my supporters we lost fairly". But the judges rejected this excuse, saying officials should have been better prepared.

"Failure of the electronic system was a direct violation of the law".

"We find that the 2017 presidential election was neither transparent nor verifiable", leading to the unprecedented decision to nullify the vote, said Mwilu.

The IEBC had set the new election for October 17.

President Uhuru Kenyatta's lawyers are seeking to challenge the verdict of the Supreme Court that annulled his win in the August 8 General Election.

The "savage" demonstrations were "intended to intimidate the judiciary", David Maraga said in a statement.

He said lower courts could follow the precedent and overturn the will of voters in other electoral contests, like local or legislative seats, adding he had asked parliament to address the issues raised by the judgment.

Kenya has the region's richest economy and is a diplomatic, trade and security hub for East Africa so the court's ruling, as well as the fresh election now scheduled for October 17, is being closely watched.

The AG's remarks have been sparked by the opposition National Super Alliance (NASA) claims that the country is in a state of 'temporary incumbency, ' which may plunge the country into a constitutional crisis if an election is not held within 60 days after nullification of presidential poll.

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