Trump on Korea — Only attitude matters

Which countries have nuclear weapons- map

GETTYMap of which countries have nuclear wepaons

President Trump has "lit the wick of war", North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho says.

Trump threatened in the U.N. speech to "totally destroy" North Korea if forced to defend the U.S. or its allies.

Two-thirds of Americans said they are very or extremely concerned about the threat North Korea's nuclear weapons program poses to the US. Ri added that North Korea's "army and people are persistently demanding to settle the final score with the Americans with a fiery hail, not words". Trump said. "That's the way it works".

When Kaesong was shut down in 2016, the conservative government of then President Park Geun-hye claimed 70% of the $100 million in wages paid each year, which was given directly to the government in Pyongyang to distribute to the workers, was diverted to finance the North's illicit nuclear weapons program.

Trump lambasted "little rocket man" Kim Jong Un for going on a "suicide mission for himself and his regime" in the speech last month.

The White House said Trump met with members of his national security team on Tuesday to discuss the growing threat from the North.

The defense minister announced, meanwhile, that a group of Australian military forces will soon arrive in South Korea as part of its Indo-Pacific defense activities. The bombers also conducted firing exercises over the East Sea and Yellow Sea, according to the BBC. More recently, Seoul accused North Korea of having hacked, stolen and leaked sensitive military secrets and Seoul-Washington war plans. "And I listen to everybody, but ultimately my attitude is the one that matters, isn't it?"

Some 235 gigabytes of military documents were taken from South Korea's Defence Integrated Data Centre in September last year, Democratic Party representative Rhee Cheol-hee said in radio appearances on Wednesday, citing information from unidentified South Korean defence officials.

US B-1 bombers flying from Guam have been seen regularly over the Korean Peninsula amid escalating tensions with Pyongyang - running regular training flights with Japanese and South Korean fighter jets that often provoke the ire of the North Korean regime.

"If I had access to the enemy's plans, not only would I know what forces were going to be arrayed against me, I would know where they will be, what weapons they will have, where the command and control nodes will be established - all critical war-fighting information". The emails included fake invitations to a fundraiser and were designed to trick victims into downloading malware.

Monroe believes that by taking these two actions, America can temporarily stop proliferation, and the world can remain stable at eight states with nukes, with future diplomacy working to make it five.

Latest News